D.A. Miller

Bringing out Roland Barthes

 

Titel: Bringing out Roland Barthes, 1992
Uitgever: University of California Press
ISBN-10: ISBN-10: 0-520-07948-5
ISBN-13: ISBN-13: 978-0-520-07948-9

Flaptekst

"The autobiographical pieces of Incidents give us a new Barthes: not the famous writer who happens to be a gay man, but the gay man who happens to be a famous writer. This is the other face of fame: bravely endured soirees parisiennes during which the aging gay celebrity is constantly surrounded and almost never desired. D. A. Miller's brilliantly militant essay relieves us of the embarrassment such images might cause us. By his tenderly uncompromising uncloseting of Barthes in works where homosexuality is at once absent and the key to intelligibility, Miller rescues Barthes from the dreary repetitiveness of hustlers and hangers-on. His critical memoires d'outre tombe should make it impossible for us ever again to ignore discreetly Barthes' homosexuality when we speak of his strength. Like a good trainer in one of those gyms surely never frequented by the Proustian Barthes, Miller 'develops' Barthes' gay muscle and, by no means incidentally, encourages us to think in entirely new ways about what gay writing might mean and be."
LEO BERSANI, author of The Culture of Redemption

In Bringing Out Roland BaTthes, D.A. Miller offers an album of moments in an imaginary "homosexual encounter" between himself and the French writer: responses to various names, phrases, images, and themes in Barthes's text that afford occasions for assessing, across differences of nation and generation, some characteristic strains of modern gay experience.

D.A. MILLER is Professor of English at Harvard University and author of The Novel and the Police (California, 1988).

"Miller's text is an important intervention on the question of Barthes's critical and theoretical voice and presence as a gay man. Written in a way which at once captures and yet radically departs from Batthes's own, writerly voice, Miller's text is a provocation to all of Barthes' s readers who would miss, willfully or not, the challenge of his homosexuality and its inscription in his work."(Graham Allen)

 

 

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